Environmental guidance for your business in Northern Ireland & Scotland

Animal by-products and food waste

Animal by-products are entire animal bodies, parts of animals, or products of animal origin that are not intended to be eaten by humans. Businesses that are likely to deal with animal by-products include food retailers and manufacturers, catering outlets, butchers, farmers, gamekeepers, animal feed suppliers and vets.

Animal by-products are tightly regulated to protect human and animal health and the environment. This includes rules for collecting, storing, transporting, handling, processing, using and disposing of animal by-products. You may also need to comply with controls on the marketing and export of animal by-products and products derived from them.

This guideline explains what animal by-products are and how they are categorised. It describes how to handle, store and transport animal by-products and how to dispose of animal by-products, food and catering waste.

Additional resources

       

 

Animal by-products are entire animal bodies, parts of animals or products of animal origin that are not intended for human consumption. These include:

  • animal carcasses and parts of animal carcasses - including fish
  • digestive tract content
  • manure from farmed animals, eg pigs, cattle and chickens
  • ova, embryos and semen which are not intended for breeding purposes
  • blood, hides, skins, hooves and horns
  • shellfish and crustacean waste
  • feathers, wool, hair and fur
  • food waste of animal or fish origin no longer intended for human consumption - including eggs, milk and cooking oil used to prepare animal products.

Meat, fish and other material from animals become animal by-products when the material is no longer intended for human consumption. This is the case even if the material is still edible.

Animal by-product controls do not generally apply to:

  • raw pet food sold directly to consumers
  • liquid milk and colostrum disposed of or used on the farm where it was produced
  • wild animals that are not suspected of carrying an infectious disease
  • excrement from domestic pets, zoo or circus animals, horse stables or wild animals, eg pigeon droppings
  • catering waste, unless it is to be used as animal feed, is going to a composting or biogas plant, or is from international transport, ie from aircraft or ships operating outside the European Union.

Catering waste is waste food from:

  • restaurants
  • catering facilities, eg in offices
  • household kitchens.

If animal by-product controls do not apply to your waste, you must comply with your duty of care for dealing with waste.

Food Waste

A food business is any business that carries out activities related to the processing, distribution, preparation or sale of food. Examples include:

  • restaurants and cafes
  • shopping centre food courts
  • canteens
  • hotels
  • pubs that serve food
  • shops that sell food
  • supermarkets
  • schools and colleges
  • prisons, nursing homes and hospitals.

In Northern Ireland

If you are a food business then you must be prepared to present food waste for separate collection:

  • by 1 April 2016 for large producers
  • by 1 April 2017 for small producers and Health and Social Care trusts.

You are a large producer if you regularly produce more than 50kg of food waste per week.

You are a small producer if you regularly produce between 5kg and 50kg of food waste per week.

(A 120 litre bin holds approximately 60kg of food waste)

Exempt businesses

Your businesses are exempt from the regulations if:

  • You produce less than 5kg of food waste per week
  • You deal with catering waste that has arisen from international transport. International is a Category 1 Animal By-product and therefore requires specialist management.

(5kg is roughly equivalent to a full domestic kitchen caddy)

There is a prohibition on the landfilling of separately collected food waste from 1 April 2015. The regulations also introduce a duty on businesses to ensure food waste is not deposited in a lateral drain or sewer from 1 April 2017.

NIEA: Regulatory position statement – Food Waste Guidance

In Scotland

If you are a food business you must be prepared to present food waste for separate collection.

Exempt businesses

Your food businesses are exempt from the regulations only if:

  • your premises are located in a rural area (as defined by the Scottish Government)
  • you produce less than 5kg of food waste per week
  • you deal with catering waste from international transport (Category 1 animal by-products) where existing controls still apply.

You can find out if your business is located in a rural area by searching the list of postcodes published by the Scottish Government.

Scottish Government: Defining rural and non-rural areas to support zero waste policies

The use of macerators to dispose of food waste in the sewer system is now banned, except for domestic premises and food producers in rural areas.

Duty of care – your waste responsibilities

Further information

DARD: Animal by-products guidance (Northern Ireland)

NIEA: Regulatory position statement – Food Waste Guidance

Scottish Government: Animal by-products

What you must do

Animal by-products are divided into three categories according to their potential risk to human and animal health. There are different rules for disposing of waste in each category.

All three categories of animal by-products must be kept separate at all times. If material from one category is mixed with material from another category, the whole mixture must be treated as being in the higher risk category.

Category 1 animal by-products

Category 1 is for very high risk material and includes:

  • animals and materials suspected or confirmed to be infected by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), such as scrapie in sheep, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle
  • animals that have been experimented on
  • zoo and pet animal carcasses
  • wild animals suspected of having an infectious disease
  • catering waste from international transport, ie aircraft and ships
  • specified risk material (SRM), ie tissues from cattle, sheep or goats that might be infected with TSEs, or carcasses that have not had SRM removed
  • animal tissue collected when treating waste water from category 1 processing plants.

Category 2 animal by-products

Category 2 is for high risk material and includes:

  • animals that are slaughtered to prevent the spread of disease
  • manure and digestive tract content
  • animals and parts of animals which die by means other than slaughtering, eg fallen stock
  • animal tissue collected when treating waste water from category 2 processing plants.

Category 3 animal by-products

Category 3 is for low risk material and includes:

  • meat and fish from food manufacturers and retailers
  • former foodstuffs of animal origin, or containing products of animal origin - this includes food that is waste due to manufacturing or packaging defects
  • catering waste, other than catering waste from international transport
  • eggs and other by-products that do not show signs of infectious disease
  • milk
  • fish and other sea animals
  • shells
  • hooves, horns and feathers.

Further information

DARD: Animal by-products guidance (Northern Ireland)

Scottish Government: Animal by-products

GOV.UK: International catering waste

What you must do

Animal by-products are divided into three categories according to their potential risk to human and animal health. There are different rules for disposing of waste in each category.

All three categories of animal by-products must be kept separate at all times. If material from one category is mixed with material from another category, the whole mixture must be treated as being in the higher risk category.

Category 1 animal by-products

Category 1 is for very high risk material and includes:

  • animals and materials suspected or confirmed to be infected by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), such as scrapie in sheep, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle
  • animals that have been experimented on
  • zoo and pet animal carcasses
  • wild animals suspected of having an infectious disease
  • catering waste from international transport, ie aircraft and ships
  • specified risk material (SRM), ie tissues from cattle, sheep or goats that might be infected with TSEs, or carcasses that have not had SRM removed
  • animal tissue collected when treating waste water from category 1 processing plants.

Category 2 animal by-products

Category 2 is for high risk material and includes:

  • animals that are slaughtered to prevent the spread of disease
  • manure and digestive tract content
  • animals and parts of animals which die by means other than slaughtering, eg fallen stock
  • animal tissue collected when treating waste water from category 2 processing plants.

Category 3 animal by-products

Category 3 is for low risk material and includes:

  • meat and fish from food manufacturers and retailers
  • former foodstuffs of animal origin, or containing products of animal origin - this includes food that is waste due to manufacturing or packaging defects
  • catering waste, other than catering waste from international transport
  • eggs and other by-products that do not show signs of infectious disease
  • milk
  • fish and other sea animals
  • shells
  • hooves, horns and feathers.

Further information

DARD: Animal by-products guidance (Northern Ireland)

Scottish Government: Animal by-products

GOV.UK: International catering waste

If you have animal by-products, you must send them to approved premises for treatment or disposal. Ideally, different categories of animal by-product should be handled at different sites. See the page in this guideline on animal by-product categories

What you must do

Category 1 material must be disposed of by:

  • direct incineration
  • rendering - followed by incineration or landfill.

International catering waste may be disposed of at a landfill site authorised by the Divisional Veterinary Office in Northern Ireland or Animal Health in Scotland.

Category 2 material must be disposed of by:

  • direct incineration
  • rendering or other authorised treatment process - followed by incineration, landfill, composting or biogas treatment.

Some category 2 material - such as manure - may be recycled without pre-treatment, eg for biogas, composting, oleo-chemical products, or used as a fertiliser if other requirements are met. Unprocessed category 2 material cannot go to landfill.

Category 3 material must be disposed of by:

  • incineration
  • rendering - followed by incineration or landfill
  • anaerobic digestion
  • alkaline hydrolysis plant
  • composting or biogas plant.

In some cases, category 3 material can be used in an approved pet food manufacturing plant or technical plant.

Category 3 material cannot be taken to landfill, except for catering waste.

Food waste

In Northern Ireland, if your business produces more than 50kg of food waste per week, you are required to have separate collection of that waste. From the 1st April 2017 this requirement also applies to businesses producing more than 5kg and up to 50 kg of food waste per week. There is no requirement for food businesses which produce less than 5kg of food waste, to collect it separately. From the 1 April 2017 food waste must not be deposited in a lateral drain or public sewer. The legislation does not apply to householders.

NIEA: Duty of Care – A Code of Practice

Food Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015

DAERA: Guidance - the Food Waste Regulations

In Scotland, if you process, prepare or sell food and produce more than 5kg of food waste a week, in an urban area, you will be required to separate that food waste from the rest of the waste you produce for separate collection. This applies to large producers (more than 50kg) from 1 January 2014 and small producers (more than 5kg) from 1 January 2016. This duty does not apply to businesses in rural areas or those producing less than 5 kg of food waste per week.

The use of macerators to dispose of food waste in the sewer system will be banned from 1 January 2016, except for domestic premises and food waste producers in rural areas.

Scottish Government: Duty of Care  - A Code of Practice

Further information

GOV.UK: Guidance for the Animal By-product industry

GOV.UK: International catering waste

Scottish Government: Animal by-products registered and approved premises

DAERA: List of Approved Premises and Operators 

If you need to dispose of farmed animal carcasses, you should contact either:

  • the National Fallen Stock Company
  • the DAERA in Northern Ireland or Animal and Plant Health Agency in Scotland
  • your local council trading standards department.

For fallen stock over 48 months old, you should contact an approved transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) sampling site to have your animal collected and disposed of.

Animals usually regarded as farm species include sheep, cattle, pigs, goats, poultry, horses and other equine species.

What you must do

Burying animal carcasses

You must not bury animal carcasses or parts of carcasses on your land except:

  • during outbreaks of notifiable disease if there is a lack of capacity at rendering plants and incinerators, or if transporting the carcasses would spread disease
  • in designated remote areas - parts of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland

Scottish Government: Designated remote areas in Scotland (PDF, 1.90MB)

You must have permission from your local Divisional Veterinary Office or Animal Health before you bury carcasses.

During disease outbreaks, you can get advice on suitable disposal methods from:

  • DAERA approved premises in Northern Ireland
  • your local Animal and Plant Heath Agency office in Scotland.

DAERA: List of Approved Premises and Operators

Animal and Plant Health Agency: Postcode search for local offices

In Scotland you can find information on burying animal carcasses in chapter ten of the Prevention of Pollution from Agricultural Activity (PEPFAA) Code.

Scottish Government: PEPFAA code

Burying pets and wild animals

You are allowed to bury dead pets on your own premises, in an authorised pet cemetery or landfill site.

Wild animals are not covered by animal by-product controls, unless they are thought to be diseased. Wild animals include:

  • wild deer
  • wild boar
  • rabbits
  • foxes
  • rats
  • squirrels
  • moles
  • wild birds.

If you have killed a wild animal as vermin or to reduce its population, you need to dispose of the carcass appropriately. This includes animals caught in a trap or snare, and animals that have been shot. Wild animal carcasses are classed as waste, and you have a legal duty of care to handle, store and dispose of them safely, so you don't cause pollution or attract vermin.

Duty of care - your waste responsibilities

Burning animal carcasses

You must not burn any animal carcasses in the open. You can only burn animal carcasses if you are in a designated remote area, if there is a disease outbreak and there is a lack of capacity at rendering plants and incinerators, or if transporting the carcasses would spread the disease.

If you burn animal carcasses in an incinerator, you may need a pollution prevention and control permit or registered exemption.

Further Information

National fallen stock company: Collection and disposal services

DAERA: Fallen cattle surveillance scheme (Northern Ireland)

DAERA helpline numbers

Animal and Plant Health Agency: Postcode search for local offices

Scottish Government: Designated remote areas in Scotland (PDF, 1.90MB)

DAERA: Animal by-products guidance (Northern Ireland)

Scottish Government: Animal by-products

When food of animal origin is no longer intended for human consumption it becomes an animal by-product. This may be when produce is removed from sale because it has passed its sell by or use by date, or because of damage, soiling or contamination to the produce or its packaging.

What you must do

Catering waste

Catering waste is waste food from restaurants, catering facilities and kitchens. Catering waste which contains animal by-products includes:

  • cooked or processed meat and fish
  • bakery products containing meat, fish or dairy products
  • cooking oil that has been used for cooking meat or fish.

At present, catering waste can go directly to landfill for disposal. It can also be sent to an approved composting or biogas facility.

Landfills cannot accept liquid waste so you should collect used cooking oil, store it in suitable containers and have it removed by an authorised waste carrier. Most used cooking oil is used to make biodiesel or is incinerated to generate electricity.

Catering waste does not include 'former foodstuffs' from retailers or food manufacturers.

In Scotland, if you process, prepare or sell food and produce more than 5kg of food waste a week, in an urban area, you will be required to separate that food waste from the rest of the waste you produce for separate collection. This applies to large producers (>50kg) from 1 January 2014 and small producers (>5kg) from 1 January 2016. This duty does not apply to businesses in rural areas or those producing less than 5 kg of food waste per week.

Scottish Government: Duty of care: A code of practice

SEPA has produced new guidance which sets out its expectations across the food waste supply chain in order to prevent waste and achieve high quality recycling

New SEPA Guidance: Food waste management in Scotland

New duties for food businesses in Northern Ireland

If you are a food business and produce more than 5kg of food waste per week (roughly one kitchen caddy full) you will be required to separate that food waste from the rest of your waste for separate collection.

NIEA: Duty of Care – A Code of Practice

NIEA: Food waste – Are you compliant?

Food Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015

International catering waste is classed as a Category 1 Animal By-Product and therefore requires specialist management. See the page in this guideline: Disposing of animal by-products.

Duty of care for waste

Former foodstuffs

Former foodstuffs are foods of animal origin, or foods that contain products of animal origin, that are no longer intended for human consumption. This includes food that is waste due to manufacturing or packaging defects. Former foodstuffs do not include catering waste from restaurants, catering facilities and kitchens.

Waste from a factory that produces cooked meat is not catering waste - it is former foodstuff (category 3 animal by-product).

You must dispose of category 3 animal by-products at approved premises, by rendering or incineration, or disposal at an approved biogas or composting plant. Generally, you cannot send category 3 animal by-products to landfill.

Raw meat or fish must not be sent to landfill.

Category 3 animal by-products include:

  • raw meat, fish and eggs
  • cooked meat and fish
  • meat and fish products that require cooking before consumption
  • catering waste other than international catering waste

See the page in this guideline: Animal by-product categories

In Scotland, if you process, prepare or sell food and produce more than 5kg of food waste a week, in an urban area, you will be required to separate that food waste from the rest of the waste you produce for separate collection. This applies to large producers (>50kg) from 1 January 2014 and small producers (>5kg) from 1 January 2016. This duty does not apply to businesses in rural areas or those producing less than 5 kg of food waste per week.

Scottish Government: Duty of care: A code of practice

New duties for food businesses in Northern Ireland

Food waste

If your business produces more than 50kg of food waste per week, you are required to have separate collection of that waste. From the 1st April 2017 this requirement also applies to businesses producing more than 5kg and up to 50 kg of food waste per week. There is no requirement for food businesses which produce less than 5kg of food waste, to collect it separately. From the 1 April 2017 food waste must not be deposited in a lateral drain or public sewer. The legislation does not apply to householders.

NIEA: Duty of Care – A Code of Practice

Food Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015

DAERA: Guidance - the Food Waste Regulations

NIEA: Duty of Care – A Code of Practice

Food Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015

International catering waste is classed as a Category 1 Animal By-Product and therefore requires specialist management. See the page in this guideline: Disposing of animal by-products.

The use of macerators to dispose of food waste in the sewer system will be banned from 1 January 2016, except for domestic premises and food waste producers in rural areas.

Duty of care for waste

International catering waste from ships and planes

International catering waste is waste food from aircraft and ships that have called at airports or ports outside the European Union. It is classed as high risk material (category 1 animal by-product). You must dispose of it by incineration, rendering or burial in an approved landfill site.

You can read about international catering waste on the Defra website.

Defra: International catering waste

Further information

GOV.UK: Guidance for the Animal By-product industry

DAERA: Animal by-products guidance (Northern Ireland)

Scottish Government: Animal by-products

SEPA Guidance: Food waste management in Scotland

What you must do

Animal by-products must be collected and transported in leak-proof, closed containers or sealed new packaging.

You must keep each category of by-product separate and clearly labelled to avoid contamination. See the page in this guideline: Animal by-product categories

Who can transport animal by-products

You must ensure that anyone removing your waste is authorised to do so.

In Northern Ireland

On 8 April 2011 new regulations introduced a two-tier registration system for waste carriers. If your carrier only transports animal by-products they should now be registered as a lower tier waste carrier. If the carrier transports other types of waste, as well as animal by-products, they must be registered as an upper tier waste carrier with the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA). You should ask for proof - such as a certificate or letter of registration - that an individual or business is authorised to handle or transport your waste.

NIEA: Registered waste carriers database

In Scotland

You should ask for proof that an individual or business is authorised to handle or transport your waste.

This proof may be a certificate of registration or a letter confirming registration as a professional carrier or broker.

SEPA: Who is registered?

Animal by-product transportation documents

All movements of animal by-products, except manure, must be accompanied by a commercial document. This is different from a waste transfer note or hazardous waste consignment note.

The commercial document should include:

  • a record of the origin and quantity of the material
  • a description of the material, including the animal by-product category
  • the date of transport
  • the name and address of the carrier and receiver
  • if the animal by-product is to be used for composting or pet food
  • any approval numbers showing that the animal by-product has been treated and is therefore safe to be used.

If you export animal by-products or send them to be processed into pet food, you may also need a health certificate from your local Divisional Veterinary Office in Northern Ireland or your local Animal Health office in Scotland.

All original documents should accompany the animal by-products during transit. The receiver of the animal by-products must keep the original documents. The waste producer and the waste carrier must keep copies. You must keep all records for at least two years.

DAERA: Animal by-products guidance (Northern Ireland)

Animal and Plant Health Agency: Transport documents and records (Scotland)

Loading and unloading animal by-products

Some loading and unloading should only be done inside a building. This includes loading and unloading slaughter and butchery waste, and tipping animal by-products onto the floor or into a hopper.

If loading and unloading inside is not possible, you may be able to 'dock' your vehicle with the building and transfer animal by-products under cover directly to or from the building. This is acceptable when loading intact animal carcases.

You may get permission to unload certain animal by-products in outside yards in very limited and tightly controlled circumstances.

DAERA: Transport, handling and storage of animal by-products (Northern Ireland)

Animal Health: Loading and unloading animal by-products (Scotland)

Further information

NIEA: Registered waste carriers database

SEPA: Who is registered?

DAERA: List of Approved Premises and Operators

GOV.UK: Local Animal & Plant Health Agency in Scotland

If you store animal by-product waste for routine collection, you must keep it separated from other waste and store each category separately. See the page in this guideline: Animal by-product categories.

Animal by-product waste must be stored in clean, sealed, leak-proof containers. Label all containers with the category of the material as follows:

  • category 3 material - not for human consumption
  • category 2 material - not for animal consumption
  • category 1 material - for disposal only

You must not store animal by-products where they could contaminate other foodstuffs or be exposed to animals or wild birds.

Use authorised waste carriers

Check that you are using an individual or business authorised by:

  • the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) in Northern Ireland
  • Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) in Scotland

for the storage, processing, treatment or disposal of animal by-product waste.

DAERA: List of Approved Premises and Operators

Scottish Government: Animal by-products registered and approved premises

Make sure that you complete a commercial document, recording the transfer of animal by-product waste. A commercial document is different from a waste transfer note or hazardous waste consignment note.

DAERA: Animal by-products guidance (Northern Ireland)

Animal and Plant Health Agency: Transport documents and records (Scotland)

Record the date that the animal by-products were removed, a description of the material, and the name and address of the waste carrier and the receiver of the waste.

Keep a copy of all documents for at least two years. You may need to show them during an inspection.

Clean and disinfect containers after each waste collection.

Have an emergency plan, eg to avoid destroying large quantities of animal by-products because of a freezer breakdown or product recall.

You must not send to landfill any packaging that is significantly contaminated with animal by-product material, eg bloodstains. You must dispose of it as an animal by-product.

Food waste

In Northern Ireland, if your business produces more than 50kg of food waste per week, you are required to have separate collection of that waste. From the 1st April 2017 this requirement also applies to businesses producing more than 5kg and up to 50 kg of food waste per week. There is no requirement for food businesses which produce less than 5kg of food waste, to collect it separately. From the 1 April 2017 food waste must not be deposited in a lateral drain or public sewer. The legislation does not apply to householders.

NIEA: Duty of Care – A Code of Practice

Food Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015

DAERA: Guidance - the Food Waste Regulations

In Scotland you should discuss with your waste contractor the services that they will offer for the collection of food waste. If you process, prepare or sell food and produce more than 5kg of food waste a week, in an urban area, you will be required to separate that food waste from the rest of the waste you produce for separate collection. This applies to large producers (more than 50kg) from 1 January 2014 and small producers (more than 5kg) from 1 January 2016. This duty does not apply to businesses in rural areas or those producing less than 5 kg of food waste per week.

International catering waste is classed as a Category 1 Animal By-Product and therefore requires specialist management. See the page in this guideline: Disposing of Animal By-Products .

Scottish Government: Duty of Care  - A Code of Practice

Further information

Find your nearest waste site

This page provides links to the full text of key pieces of environmental legislation relating to animal by-products and food waste. The websites hosting the legislation may list amendments separately.

If you are setting up an environmental management system (EMS) for your business, you can use this list to start compiling your legal register. Your legal adviser or environmental consultant will be able to tell you if other environmental legislation applies to your specific business.

Environmental management systems and environmental reports

Northern Ireland

European Community (EC) Regulation 1069/2009 laying down health rules as regards animal by-products and derived products not intended for human consumption. Sets the framework for legal controls on animal by-products.

EU Regulations 592/2014 amending EU142/2011 as regards the use of animal by-products and derived products as a fuel in combustion plants Amends EU 142/2011, implementing EC 1069/2009 laying down health rules regarding animal by-products and products not intended for human consumption, as regards the use of animal by-products and derived products as a fuel in combustion plants.

EU Regulation 2017/1262/EU: Amending Regulation (EU) No 142/2011 as regards the use of manure of farmed animals as a fuel in combustion plants This regulation amends the commission regulation 142/2011 updating the requirements to allow the use of farmed animals of species other than poultry to be used as fuel in combustion plants with a total rated thermal output not exceeding 50MW.

EC Regulation 142/2011 implementing EC Regulation 1069/2009. Implements the legal controls on animal by-products in the UK and other European member states.

EC Regulation 811/2003 regarding the intra-species recycling ban for fish, the burial and burning of animal by-products and certain transitional measures. Provides for disposal of animal by-products by burning or burial in event of outbreak of disease. Defines 'on site burning or burial'.

Rendering (Fluid Treatment) Order (Northern Ireland) SR 2001/378. Bans spreading untreated ruminant condensate on land. Defines ruminant related fluid and measures for testing, treatment and discharge. Sets measures for rendering animal products and requirements for record keeping, cleansing and disinfection.

Animal By-Products (Enforcement) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015 SR 332

Enforces EU Animal By-Products Regulation 106/2009. Sets out rules for dealing with animal by-products not intended for human consumption, including disposal and use, placing on the market and prohibitions on feeding. Places requirements on operators.

Food Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015 SR14

Provide for the separate collection of food waste. They place a duty on food businesses producing in excess of 5kg of food waste per week to present food waste for separate collection and place a duty on businesses to ensure food waste is not deposited in a lateral drain or sewer. Place a duty on those who transport food waste to collect and transport such waste separately from other waste.

Scotland

European Community (EC) Regulation 1069/2009 laying down health rules as regards animal by-products and derived products not intended for human consumption.Sets the framework for legal controls on animal by-products.

EU Regulations 592/2014 amending EU142/2011 as regards the use of animal by-products and derived products as a fuel in combustion plants Amends EU 142/2011, implementing EC 1069/2009 laying down health rules regarding animal by-products and products not intended for human consumption, as regards the use of animal by-products and derived products as a fuel in combustion plants.

EU Regulation 2017/1262/EU: Amending Regulation (EU) No 142/2011 as regards the use of manure of farmed animals as a fuel in combustion plants This regulation amends the commission regulation 142/2011 updating the requirements to allow the use of farmed animals of species other than poultry to be used as fuel in combustion plants with a total rated thermal output not exceeding 50MW.

EC Regulation 142/2011 implementing EC Regulation 1069/2009. Implements the legal controls on animal by-products in the UK and other European member states.

EC Regulation 811/2003 regarding the intra-species recycling ban for fish, the burial and burning of animal by-products and certain transitional measures.Provides for disposal of animal by-products by burning or burial in event of outbreak of disease. Defines 'on site burning or burial'. .

Animal By- Products (Enforcement)(Scotland) Regulations SSI 307 Enforces EU Animal By Products Regulation 106/2009. Sets out rules for dealing with animal by-products not intended for human consumption, including disposal and use, placing on the market, and prohibitions on feeding.Places requirements on operators. Revokes 2011 regulations, SSI 171

The Animal By-Products (Miscellaneous Amendments) (Scotland) Regulations 2015 Amends the 2013 regulations and prevents fish waste from being sent to landfill in remote areas.

The Waste (Scotland) Regulations 2012 The regulations introduce a number of important new requirements including the segregation of materials such as glass, metal, plastics, paper and card for recycling. It also introduces the requirement for food businesses to present food waste for collection and a ban on sending segregated materials for incineration or to landfill. Waste contractors must provide services that enable high quality recycling.

Further information

Environmental legislation on NetRegs

Whats new on NetRegs

  • Waste – Duty of Care Roles and Responsibilities

    The Northern Ireland Environment Agency has published a short guide to the duty of care responsibilities including advice and information for waste producers, carriers and those accepting, storing and treating waste.

    https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/publications/waste-duty-care-responsibilities

  • Please let us know your thoughts on our new website

    What do you think about our new and improved website. We want your feedback on what you like, what you don’t like and ways we can continue to improve the website. Follow the link to complete the very short survey: NetRegs website – User feedback

  • NEW guidance on Environmental Management Systems

    We have recently updated and improved our guidance on Environmental Management Systems (EMS). You can find the guidance via the Environmental Topics tab or alternatively select the following link Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  • Consultation on proposed changes to the packaging recycling business targets

    See NI Future legislation or Scotland Future legislation for details of the Consultation

  • NetRegs SMEnvironment survey 2016

    NetRegs has carried out a survey of environmental awareness among SMEs. There are separate reports for Scotland and Northern Ireland.

  • NIEA Guidance - Greenfield Excavated Matrials in Construction

    NIEA and the CEF have developed a Regulatory Position to promote Sustainable re-use of natural excavated material from Greenfield sites.

    NIEA: Guidance on the Regulation of Greenfield Excavated Materials in Construction and Development

  • New GPP 2 Above Ground Oil Storage

    The replacements for the PPGs are being developed. Now available GPP 2 Above Ground Oil Storage

  • SEPA Consultation on an Intergated Authorisation Framework

    SEPA is asking for your views on the proposals for integrated authorisations.

    Consultation documents

  • GPP 24 Stables, Kennels and Catteries

    NEW GPP 24 now available: Stables, Kennels and Catteries

  • ENDS Award Shortlist

    NetRegs has been nominated for 3 ENDS Awards with the result being revealed on the 4th of May.

  • NetRegs wins an ENDS Environmental Impact Award

    Knowledge development category winners, see the END Awards

  • EIA (Agriculture) Regulations for Northern Ireland

    Any person intending to alter the use or management of areas of uncultivated or semi-natural land must obtain prior approval from the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA).

    Read more on the DAERA website

  • Download our NEW leaflet today: Duty of Care for waste

    NetRegs have produced a new leaflet for Scottish businesses explaining what you must do to comply with YOUR duty of care for waste.

    Duty of Care for waste (Scotland) leaflet (PDF - 775KB)

     

NetRegs on NetRegs on youTube

View our latest videos & subscribe to our channel.

NetRegs Update Newsletter

Free monthly email newsletter with environmental updates for Northern Ireland and Scotland

Sign up for free today!

Permits

NIEA - Apply online

SEPA - Application forms